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Kanoa Zimmerman

Words / Daniel Ikaika Ito

The summer of 2012 was a dismal season for waves on the South Shore of O‘ahu. Old-timers and the local news called it the “worst summer of surf in history.” From Memorial Day to the end of August there were only two substantial swells in Town. Photographer Kanoa Zimmerman, 30, happened to score one of the brief windows of waves while in Honolulu for an exhibition of his work put on by Interisland Terminal. Kanoa showcased black and white images captured with Nikonos, Contax and Mamiya 35 mm film cameras. The San Francisco-based, Native Hawaiian prefers the tangible aspect of shooting film and having something physical in the end over DSLRs with images stored on a hard drive. Read more

Sophia Chang
Sophia Chang
Interview and Portrait / Ja Tecson

Ja Tecson: What do you love most about living in Queens?
Sophia Chang: New York City is a magical place and quite frankly it’s the best city in the world! I was born and raised in Queens. It’s home to me. What I love most about living here is that it’s so diverse. It’s the real New York City. You have a huge variety of different nationalities, and cultures all clashing in one town. My specific neighborhood is called Woodside and it has a rich Irish, Filipino, Thai, Tibetan, Indian and Spanish community. Talk about a melting pot. Read more
 

Contrast Magazine

James Jean

JAMES JEAN
Words / Carolyn Mirante
Photography / Brandon Shigeta

James Jean is an enigmatic figure. Trained as an illustrator, Jean acquired a cult following with his unique and meticulous style. In 2008, he surprised the world by leaving the realm of commercial illustration for the more structured world of fine art. His first foray into this realm—a solo exhibition at the Martha Otero Gallery in LA—was met with great success. Today, nearly two years after the opening of a much-speculated-on exhibition at the Tilton Gallery in NYC (Parallel Lives), Jean opens up about his life, creative inspirations, and what the future has in store for him. Read more

Estevan Oriol

Estevan Oriol
Words / Daniel Ikaika Ito
Portrait / Mark Kushimi

The first camera Estevan Oriol bought was a Canon AE-1, and it’s been his tool of choice ever since. He didn’t find photography, rather it found the Los Angeles native in the early-’90s as the tour manager for hip-hop heavyweights House of Pain and Cypress Hill. His father, Eriberto, who was a photographer, gave Estevan a Minolta to document life on the road with the rappers. From there it manifested into a career for the burly, tatted-up Latino. His stunning images of low riders, gangs and tattoo culture gained him a loyal following, while his portraits of athletes, artists and celebrities garnered Estevan mainstream recognition. He shot campaigns for big brands like Cadillac and Apple; directed music videos for artists like Enimem, Cypress Hill and Blink 182; and produced shoots for internationally renowned photographers like Luca Babini for GQ Italy. His book, “LA Portraits,” showcases the gritty, street culture of his hometown, but moreover, shows the beauty that he is able to capture with analog film. Read more